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2014

DOE awards $224,000 to PPG to develop new class of pigments

PPG, Berkeley Lab aim to produce dark-colored coatings with unprecedented solar reflectance


PITTSBURGH, April 4, 2014 – PPG Industries’ (NYSE:PPG) industrial coatings business has received a $224,000 award from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to help develop dark-colored pigments for cool metal roof and fa├žade coatings that incorporate near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence and reflectance to improve energy performance.

The award is part of a $530,000 project that includes a $250,000 award to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) to partner with PPG on the research and $56,000 in cost-sharing by PPG.

While painting a metal roof white is the simplest way to keep the sun’s energy from heating a building’s interior, most consumers will do so only if the roof is flat. For sloped roofs, they prefer darker coatings that absorb more visible light, including many that also absorb more invisible NIR solar radiation. Because colors absorb more solar energy as they get darker, buildings with dark-colored roofs are warmer and more expensive to cool than buildings with white roofs.

To combat this problem, PPG makes products such as ULTRA-COOL® coatings that reflect invisible NIR radiation, but dark ULTRA-Cool coatings still absorb visible light energy that is ultimately converted into heat.

The goal of the PPG/Berkeley Lab program is to develop a more advanced class of dark-colored pigments that can convert a portion of the absorbed visible light energy into NIR energy that is radiated away from buildings.

The new pigment technology under investigation would be a significant advance over current cool-coating pigments. PPG and Berkeley Lab estimate that cool coatings based on the new pigment technology could achieve effective solar reflectance (ESR) values of 0.5 to 0.7 compared to ESR values of 0.1 to 0.3 for standard pigments. An ESR improvement of 0.4 and widespread deployment of coatings with these pigments for residential applications in warm and hot areas of the U.S. could save up to $1.3 billion annually in related energy costs.

Bill Retsch, PPG associate director of research, industrial coatings, said that when PPG learned that Berkeley Lab was investigating a new class of cool pigments, it immediately began looking for ways to support the project. “PPG and Berkeley Lab are focused on fundamentally understanding these pigments and how to incorporate them into coatings so they can provide the greatest energy benefit,” he explained. “We appreciate the support we have received from the DOE to investigate truly cutting-edge energy-efficient concepts.”

PPG recently partnered with Berkeley Lab’s Heat Island Group to study the effects of dirt build-up on cool roof coatings, and with Berkeley Lab’s Windows & Daylighting group to examine energy-efficient window designs. PPG maintains a portfolio of research projects to advance sustainable building and design.

For more information, visit www.ppgindustrialcoatings.com or call 888-774-2001.

PPG: BRINGING INNOVATION TO THE SURFACE.
PPG Industries' vision is to continue to be the world’s leading coatings and specialty materials company. Through leadership in innovation, sustainability and color, PPG helps customers in industrial, transportation, consumer products, and construction markets and aftermarkets to enhance more surfaces in more ways than does any other company. Founded in 1883, PPG has global headquarters in Pittsburgh and operates in nearly 70 countries around the world. Net sales in 2013 were $15.1 billion. PPG shares are traded on the New York Stock Exchange (symbol:PPG). For more information, visit www.ppg.com and follow @PPGIndustries on Twitter.
 
Bringing innovation to the surface is a trademark and ULTRA-Cool is a registered trademark of PPG Industries Ohio, Inc.
 
 
Contact:
Sharon Bird
PPG Industrial Coatings
724-274-3845
sbird@ppg.com
www.ppgindustrialcoatings.com